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, there's also hand wringing over what senator dick durbin said in the speech at the center for american progress and we have this, dick durbin, not what he said but didn't say and preparled remarks he said progressives should be willing to talk about ways to ensure the long-term viability of the social security, medicare and medicaid but those conversations should not be a part of a plan to avert the fiscal cliff and prepared remarks. he didn't say that in the speech. you have a lot of republicans on the -- excuse me, democrats on the left greatly concerned about what will happen to medicare and quite honestly not ready to put that conversation on the table. >> well, i think that's correct. you're speaking about a certain percentage of democrats. i would include in that list bernie sander who is sent out an e-mail blast today saying medicare, medicare and social security should all be off the table. now, in reality, i think social security really can be and should be off the table because it's not a contributor to the federal deficit. it's well funded for decades ahead but if you look a
principles? i was left with the impression that they would. illinois democratic senator dick durbin spoke today at the liberal center for american progress where he said this about the possibility of going off the cliff which fears of this show know is is really more of a curb than a cliff. >> some have called let's go over the cliff and watch what happens. we know if we're not careful, it will in fact stop economic growth and hurt everyone through every income category, particularly those most vulnerable. >> what he did not say is he must not go off the cliff. because the cliff is president obama's and the congressional democrats leverage over republicans. if we do go off the cliff or the curb on january 1st, a republican nightmare will occur. all income tax rates will go up and defense spending will be cut by 600 billion. other spending, some of it dear to republicans, will also be cut by another 600 billion. the fiscal cliff is much scarier to republicans than it is to democrats. so, the president and his allies must continue to make republicans believe they are willing to go off cliff
to the democratic base. yesterday the senate's number two democrat dick durbin went to the liberal center for american progress and argued that in order to be, quote, part of the conversations progressives will have to accept some hard truths. >> we need to be open to some topics, some issues that are painful and hard for us to talk abo about. we cannot stand by the sidelines in denial untouched, unamended, medicare is going to run out of money in 12 years. that is scary. >> but it's what durbin didn't say that was striking. in his prepared remarks durbin was going to say the following. quote, progressives should be willing to talk about ways to ensure the long-term viability of social security, medicare and medicaid, but those conversations should not be part of a plan to avert the fiscal cliff. durbin never said those remarks. he left that out. he later said he stood by those comments, and he did argue that medicare shouldn't be part of any up front down payment on the debt but part of the next year's long longer term negotiation. now while the short term talk to republicans may be toug
that is reached before the end of the year. >> this morning, dick durbin didn't really want to get into specifics. you aren't hearing a lot of numbers from a lot of people, but did say he was encouraged. take a listen. >> if i sound bland and general at this point, it's exactly to the point he made. when the doors close and we sit down with revenue on one side, entitlements on the other, then we get specific and come up with a bipartisan plan. >> ryan, to susan's point of who is the president talking to, is this something to be hashed out between president obama and john boehner. >> i guess so. because dick durbin himself has been confusing in what he's been saying publicly. on sunday he said sure medicare and medicaid can be part of the discussion. today he's giving a speech where it should not be part of the conversation. there this morning he's saying once we get into a room, we can start talking about it. and there are ways that i think liberals would agree to do medicare and medicaid. you know, if you're tinkering on the supplier side like, you know, say medical device companies or something
to in 2011. majority leader harry reid has ruled that out this time and the number two democrat durbin repeated reid's position on sunday. >> social security does not add one penny to our debt. not a penny. it's a separate funded operation and we can do things, and i believe we should, now, smaller things, played out over the longer term that gives it solvency. medicare is another story. >> there's still staff level discussions going on. and, by the way, as much as washington gets caught up in the conventional wisdom of what senators are saying, remember right now the senate are 100 ehechted pundits. the game is between the white house and house republicans for now. at some point the action could move to the senate. but right now it's about the house. it's a possibility at some point folks on capitol hill expect the white house to call another meeting of boehner, mcconnell, reid and pelosi along with the president. at some point this week. though nothing is scheduled. the first major appointment that the president makes will probably come in the next week to ten days. just two candidat
dick durbin was over at the senator for american progress yesterday and he made it very, very clear that when the word entitlement reform is used or the phrase, there's one thing it should not include. here's senator durbin. >> i think we should take social security off the table for the current fiscal cliff and deficit discussion but be very honest about what we're going to achieve in the near term. i think we should create the equivalent of a simpson bowles commission for social security and give them eight months to a year, a directive to come up with a plan to buy 75 years of solvency for social security. >> bill: social security is really a different issue isn't it? >> absolutely. it is. i would agree with senator durbin absolutely. i'll give you a reform in medicare i think democrats would support. and that is looking at prescription drugs. and making it more competitive. >> bill: amen. >> or really crackening down on the fraud that takes place through the medical devices which is not with individuals c
to make sure they go up now. dick durbin, number two senate democrat and close to the white house and gave a speech yesterday about the entitlement aspect. medicare, medicaid. the entitlement aspect and basically said we don't want entitlements to be part of the immediate talks january 1st but think as democrats they should be part of longer terms talks for next year. i'm just wondering, is there a sense from the white house among democrats of what it is they're prepared to give in on on terms of entitlement? >> not enough to satisfy the republicans, this's for sure. they say up here they have seen nothing. unfortunately, the few people who are beginning to even talk about the need for eventual compromise like a tom cole, like a dick durbin are quickly getting smacked down here, particularly on the republican side. that congressman just got a spanking from john boehner in front of his caucus today so there's -- doesn't seem to be any movement in that direction. i was at a breakfast with bowles and simpson this morning and erskine bowles saying he think there is's a 1 in 3 chance of this wo
times, but he has not placed those on the table. we have leading senators like senator durbin who has the courage to deal with these issues. he was on the simpson-bowles committee who said that we can't deal with those now in the dealing with the fiscal cliff, we need to put that off into the future. my experience is what you put off to the future never happen here. >> i hope we can get a deal. >>> me too. >>. >>> great to see both of you. john let me start with you. cornyn is pessimistic, but the markets are up today, despite the glum faces we have seen. cornyn has said he's pessimis c pessimistic, is he willing realistic or do you think we're going to get a deal? >> i think he's being a strategic scrooge. he's saying we need a balanced plan, but the president's not dealing with entitlealment reform and cuts. to give a balanced plan, republicans have to cut taxes. >> he said i put revenue on the table. but he wouldn't talk about the rates. >> also when asked about these specific entitlement reforms, he didn't talk about those either. we need to see some substance behind that. >> did
have people, thoughtful members like my old bass, senator dick durbin, saying that everything is on the table but without being specific about it, because they'll do that behind closed doors as they should, frankly. so, yes, i think the left has a tacit sort of acknowledgment that, yes, in fact, there are going to be some painful things that we have to swallow on the left-hand side of the aisle. we should. if the right's going to separate increases, we should accept certain things like testing, et cetera, because at the end of the day this is about compromise. this is also very much, thomas, about the president's ability to show leadership. you hear the republicans harp on and on about obama not showing leadership. they did it before the campaign, during the campaign, and now they're saying, mr. president, we need you to show some leadership. accept tax rate increases without forcing his own party to accept other things on our side. both sides have to share the pain to get the budget balanced and promote this theory of economic fairness. that's what he's doing out there. >> co
. >> dick durbin says when you're talking about entitlement reform or cuts in spending for medicare, medicaid for example, he says that's too complicated now. listen to what he said this morning. >> when it comes to medicare, we know that it's going to run out of money in 12 years. whatever changes we want to make should be thoughtful changes not made in the heat of the fiscal cliff. >> can you defer medicare for example -- medicare reform until after you get a deal on the fiscal cliff? >> well, if we do that, wolf, i think what you have to do is also defer the issue of taxes. i think you extend tax rates some time into the foreseeable future whether that's six months or a year and allow us to go through the process where we can deal with entitlement reform and tax reform in regular order. i don't see republicans supporting something up here that deals with taxes that doesn't have entitlement reform incorporated into that. so i think right now we're a little bit of a standoff, but the way to solve this would be of course to extend the existing tax rates which is by the way something
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)